David Foster Wallace’s Long-form Journalism

Photo of David Foster Wallace (Steve Rhodes/flickr)

I must confess, as did On The Media’s Bob Garfield, that until last week “I’d never read a single word of David Foster Wallace’s work because he’s reputed as a novelist to be very dense and difficult, along Thomas Pynchon/James Joyce lines, and I didn’t even know he did journalism. But …, I’ve been reading his reporting pieces, and they are simply magnificent – crystal clear and fact filled.”

The blurb for OTM’s interview about this pyrotechnic novelist and lucid long-form journalist is loaded with links to magazine pieces freely available on the web:

David Foster Wallace died last Friday at the age of 46. Known best as a fiction writer, he was also a journalist who wrote singular pieces about subjects as varied as porn industry awards, tennis-as-religion, luxury cruises, presidential campaigning, talk radio stamina, Midwestern wind patterns and lobster sentience. Pomona College professor Kathleen Fitzpatrick remembers Wallace’s point of view.”

Read David Foster Wallace’s NYT obit. Thanks to Steve Rhodes/flickr for the photo.

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