Attention Economy – August 29, 2011

Line art from the “First Book of Jazz” (1954), a children’s book by poet Langston Hughes. [Source: brainpickings.org http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2011/07/25/childrens-books-by-adult-authors-2/#langstonhughes]

  • 7 (More) Children’s Books by Famous “Adult” Literature Authors | Brain Pickings 072511
    Maria Popova: “Prolific poet, social activist, novelist, playwright, and columnist Langston Hughes is considered one of the fathers of jazz poetry, a literary art form that emerged in the 1920s and eventually became the foundation for modern hip-hop. In 1954, the 42-year-old Hughes decided to channel his love of jazz into a sort-of-children’s book that educated young readers about the culture he so loved. The First Book of Jazz was born, taking on the ambitious task of being the first-ever children’s book to review American music, and to this day arguably the best. Hughes covered every notable aspect of jazz, from the evolution of its eras to its most celebrated icons to its geography and sub-genres, and made a special point of highlighting the essential role of African-American musicians in the genre’s coming of age. Hughes even covers the technicalities of jazz — rhythm, percussion, improvisation, syncopation,blue notes, harmony.”
  • Lena Horne – Stormy Weather (1943) – YouTube
    Here’s the full version of a performance that can be found truncated elsewhere on YouTube — from the 1943 film of the same name, the great Lena Horne delivers a sizzling performance of her signature song
  • Farewell, NPR Family : Soapbox : NPR 032010
    NPR producer Davar Iran Ardalan : “I spent countless days and nights logging tape, listening back to interviews, editing sound files, being a skeptic, testing, experimenting, failing sometimes and getting right back up and trying again. From them I have learned to be a tenacious journalist and to listen for the mystery of a story. Eventually, no story for me was simple, it had to have an arch, a reason for being, a narrative, a sound portrait of that slice of life. “
  • Presidential Reading – On The Media 082611
    President Obama received criticism this week about the number of fiction books on his summer reading list. Some pundits argue that reading fiction makes him appear to be a political lightweight or “out of touch with reality.” President Theodore Roosevelt, however, was a voracious reader of all genres. Brooke spoke to his biographer, Edmund Morris, about the reading habits of the 26th president and how an appreciation of fiction is a sign of a rich mind.
  • Oscar Pistorius win 100m at Beijing Paralympics – YouTube
    Oscar Pistorius, the Blade Runner, win the gold medal at 100m (class T44) at the Beijing Paralympic Games 2008
  • BBC Sport – World Athletics 2011: Pistorius denies blades will give an advantage
    South African Paralympian Oscar Pistorius tells BBC Radio 5 live’s Mark Pougatch that he is feeling “nervous” but insists he is ready to compete in the 400m at the World Athletics Championships in Daegu. Pistorius will become the first ever amputee to race at the highest level after shaving nearly half a second off his personal best to qualify for the Championships. The man known as ‘Blade Runner’ also insists his prosthetic limbs do not give him an unfair advantage over his able-bodied competitors.
  • About SIGGRAPH | SIGGRAPH 2011
    Now in its 38th year, the SIGGRAPH conference is the premier international event on computer graphics and interactive techniques. SIGGRAPH 2011 is expected to draw thousands of professionals from five continents to Vancouver, British Columbia. The SIGGRAPH conference attracts the most respected technical and creative people from all over planet Earth. The SIGGRAPH community includes people everywhere who are excited by research, science, art, animation, gaming, interactivity, education, and the web. SIGGRAPH 2011 is sponsored by The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), an educational and scientific society uniting the world’s computing educators, researchers, and professionals to inspire dialogue, share resources and address the field’s challenges.
  • Longreads: The best long-form stories on the web
    They’re stories that are best enjoyed away from your desk — whether it’s on a daily commute, an airplane, a subway, or your couch. It’s in-depth stories, perfect for the iPad, iPhone or Kindle, and apps like Instapaper, Flipboard, Readability and Read It Later. Longreads posts links to new stories every day — they include long-form journalism, magazine stories from your favorite publications (The New Yorker, Esquire, The Atlantic), short stories, interview transcripts, and even historical documents. (For the record: Longreads are typically more than 1,500 words.)
  • The Environment Report: The Collapse of the Salmon Economy (Part One) 082311
    The Great Lakes are changing so fast that the agencies which manage fishing cannot keep up with the changes. Some types of fish populations are collapsing and others are thriving… at least for now. In a project between The Environment Report and Michigan Watch, Lester Graham has a series of reports on what’s happening and why. This first report looks at some of the history of fishing on the Great Lakes
  • The Environment Report: Big Returns for Subsidized Fish (Part 2) 082411
    Fishing in the Great Lakes wouldn’t be what it is today without stocking Pacific salmon in the lakes. But it costs a lot of money. Michigan fisheries managers say it’s worth every dime. In “The Collapse of the Salmon Economy,” a joint collaboration between The Environment Report and Michigan Watch, Lester Graham reports on the economic benefits of subsidizing salmon fishing in the Great Lakes:
  • The Environment Report: Collapse of Salmon in Lake Huron (Part 3) 082511
    The Environment Report in a collaborative project with Michigan Watch is looking at salmon fishing on the Great Lakes. Salmon fishing has meant a lot of tourism dollars for cities along the coasts. But, changes in Lake Huron have caused a collapse of salmon. In the final report of the series “The Collapse of the Salmon Economy,” Lester Graham looks at what happened and whether other lakes will lose their salmon.
  • 7 (More) Children’s Books by Famous “Adult” Literature Authors | Brain Pickings 072511
    Prolific poet, social activist, novelist, playwright, and columnist Langston Hughes is considered one of the fathers of jazz poetry, a literary art form that emerged in the 1920s and eventually became the foundation for modern hip-hop. In 1954, the 42-year-old Hughes decided to channel his love of jazz into a sort-of-children’s book that educated young readers about the culture he so loved. The First Book of Jazz was born, taking on the ambitious task of being the first-ever children’s book to review American music, and to this day arguably the best. Hughes covered every notable aspect of jazz, from the evolution of its eras to its most celebrated icons to its geography and sub-genres, and made a special point of highlighting the essential role of African-American musicians in the genre’s coming of age. Hughes even covers the technicalities of jazz — rhythm, percussion, improvisation, syncopation,blue notes, harmony.
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