Attention Economy – September 12, 2011

Visitors at the National September 11 Memorial and Museum can touch the names of those who perished in the attacks. The names are cast in bronze parapets ringing the reflection pools that now fill the footprints of the Twin Towers. It is a worthy example of a universal design element that also provides tactile accessibility to blind visitors. [Source: C-Span live stream]
Visitors at the National September 11 Memorial and Museum can touch the names of those who perished in the attacks. The names are cast in bronze parapets ringing the reflection pools that now fill the footprints of the Twin Towers. It is a worthy example of a universal design element that also provides tactile accessibility to blind visitors. [Source: C-Span live stream]

  • 9/11: New York remembers | Reuters.com
  • The Talk Online – Web Offers Both News and Comfort – NYTimes.com 091201
    [Dave Winerlinks to this] NYT writeup, the day following 9/11/01, on the role bloggers played in getting the first information about the attacks.
  • Scripting News: My 9/11 | 091011
    Dave Winer: “I realize I am a strange duck from the standpoint of 9/11. I experienced it from California, and blogged it, as my NY counterparts couldn’t. I received their emails and pointed to their pictures and stories. I acted as an online anchor, and learned a lot that day, and grew a lot, all while being scared out of my mind and depressed. The blogging helped me get through it.”
  • Scripting News: 9/11/2001
    Dave Winer’s historic blog post from 9/11 — still linked on the net.
  • Let the Great World Spin (Book One) by Colum McCann | Poor Sap Publishing 062910
    John Francisconi: “That I already consider it likely the best post 9/11 novel is remarkable considering the entire book takes place, for the most part, on a single day in 1974. The knowledge of September 11th completely informs your reading of the novel, though. It lingers over every event in the novel. When one section follows mothers whose sons have died in Vietnam, an immediate parallel is drawn to the wars spawned by 9/11.”
  • Telling jokes about september 11th – On The Media 090911
    Comedian and host of the WTF podcast Marc Maron was living in New York during the attacks of 9/11. Brooke talks to Maron about how comedians began to grapple with the tragedy in their acts and how he dealt with it personally.
  • Growing up in the shadow of 9/11 – On The Media
    When WNYC’s Radio Rookies–a program that teaches kids how to tell their own stories–put out a call for personal tales of 9/11, Brendan Illis answered. Illis was 6-years-old when the towers fell, after which he became a voracious news consumer. He says 9/11 and the past decade of news have played a pivotal role in the direction of his life.
  • Al Jazeera English in America – On The Media 090911
    Since its launch in 2006, Al Jazeera English has had a lot of trouble breaking into American markets. Andrew Stelzer reports a cautionary tale about Burlington, Vermont, a town whose cable service picked up Al Jazeera English, inspiring intense local protests.
  • Newly Released 9/11 Audio – On The Media
    This week, Rutgers Law Review published an archive of conversations between air traffic controllers on the morning of September 11, 2001. Jim Dwyer of The New York Times wrote about the newly released audio, and talks to Bob about what we can learn from them.
  • Could ‘Submission’ Be America’s Sept. 11 Novel? : NPR 090611
    Maureen Corrigan: The Submission is a gorgeously written novel of ideas about America in the wake of Sept. 11. It tackles subjects like identity politics, undocumented immigrants and the stress fractures of democracy. Maybe the most audacious question that’s posed by Amy Waldman’s debut novel, however, is the implicit one that lingers long after a reader finishes it: Namely, could it be that a decade after the attacks, America finally has the Sept. 11 novel — one that does justice, artistically and historically, to the aftershocks of that day? | Of course, there have been other serious fiction contenders that have ruminated on Sept. 11; among them, Joseph O’Neill’s Netherland; Deborah Eisenberg’s short story collection, Twilight of the Superheroes; Don DeLillo’s Falling Man; and Ken Kalfus’ dark tour de force, A Disorder Peculiar to the Country.
  • Big City Book Club | ‘Let the Great World Spin’ – NYTimes.com 090611
    Gina Bellafante: “Let the Great World Spin,” Colum McCann’s award-winning 2009 novel, a portrait of the city in perhaps its most vivid period of decline. Set in the 1970s, the book is a 9/11 narrative by implication, his idea being that New York is, fundamentally, a place where wondrous things rise from the ashes. We can argue (and I hope we will) about whether or not he is right in his assessment, but I think it is fair to say that above all, “Let the Great World Spin’’ is an enormously hopeful book. What struck me initially was the extent to which Mr. McCann, a native Irishman, shares a certain kind of New Yorker’s nostalgia for the blighted New York of the ’70s… But he is primarily committed to a characterization of the city as a place animated by mad and glorious subversions: by a feral artistic sensibility, by a radical sense of religious fealty, by a willingness on the part of certain members of the elite to seek and find connection with those far beyond their social order.
  • BBC – BBC World Service Programmes – The Strand, 30/08/2011, Francesc Torres – ‘Memory Remains’
    Francesc Torres talks to Anna McNamee about his photographic exhibition Memory Remains which marks the 10th anniversary of 9/11.
  • Slain Priest: ‘Bury His Heart, But Not His Love’ : NPR 090911
    Father Mychal Judge was a Franciscan friar and a chaplain to the New York City Fire Department. He was also a true New York character. Born in Brooklyn, Mychal Judge seemed to know everyone in the city, from the homeless to the mayor. On the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, Father Mychal arrived at the World Trade Center shortly after the first plane hit. And as firefighters and other rescue personnel ran into the North Tower, he went with them.
  • At Maison Lesage, Beauty Embroidered By Hand : NPR 090911
    Adornment rules in a series of sunny rooms at Paris’ oldest embroidery studio Maison Lesage — the House of Lesage. Workers in white lab coats attach sequins, beads, rhinestones, shells, ribbons and feathers to pieces of air-thin fabric … which will adorn de luxe creations by the top names in fashion: Dior, Louis Vuitton, Yves Saint Laurent — all the famous French designers. The Lesage studio was purchased by Chanel in 2002. Chanel chief designer Karl Lagerfeld wanted to ensure that this 130-year-old embroidery business would stay in business, in a world of mass-produced, made-in-China clothing. The House of Lesage is a house of hand work. Executed by what the French call petites mains — little hands. They do it all. “The drawing, the sewing, the embroidery …” Everything done by “very precious hands,” says Chanel’s Angelique Ginguene.
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