Attention Economy – September 16, 2011

Salman Khan talk at TED 2011

  • Khan Academy | Learn almost anything for free
    With a library of over 2,400 videos covering everything from arithmetic to physics, finance, and history and 150 practice exercises, we’re on a mission to help you learn what you want, when you want, at your own pace.
  • Learn to code | Codecademy
    Codecademy is the easiest way to learn how to code. It’s interactive, fun, and you can do it with your friends.
  • Full Interview: Cathy N. Davidson on Evolving Education | Spark 090211
    [re attention blindness; William James on attention] Duke University professor Cathy N. Davidson is author of the new book “Now You See It: How the Brain Science of Attention Will Transform the Way We Live, Work, and Learn.” She believes that how we learn is a relic of 19th century values, and if it has any chance at relevancy, must embrace aspects of our digital lives that are normally shunned by scholars – technology, collaboration, and yes, even distraction.
  • Remembering the Twin Towers Using Augmented Reality | Spark 082911
    Brian August has created an app that uses augmented reality to add a silhouette of the World Trade Center to images of New York City’s skyline. He calls the project 110 Stories, and he tells Nora why he thinks this app is about more than the destruction of the twin towers. (Runs: 8:47)
  • 9/11 Memorial Webcam | National September 11 Memorial & Museum
    EarthCam’s live webcam brings into view the National September 11 Memorial & Museum. Use the navigation tools to direct the camera. You can also save the high definition image on your computer, print it or share it with friends.
  • National September 11 Memorial & Museum | World Trade Center Memorial
  • All The Names: Algorithmic Design and the 9/11 Memorial | blprnt.blg 061011
    Jer Thorpe: “The project was to design an algorithm for placement of names on the 9/11 memorial in New York City. In architect Michael Arad‘s vision for the memorial, the names were to be laid according to where people were and who they were with when they died – not alphabetical, nor placed in a grid. Inscribed in bronze parapets, almost three thousand names would stream seamlessly around the memorial pools. Underneath this river of names, though, an arrangement would provide a meaningful framework; one which allows the names of family and friends to exist together. Victims would be linked through what Arad terms ‘meaningful adjacencies’ – connections that would reflect friendships, family bonds, and acts of heroism. through these connections, the memorial becomes a permanent embodiment of not only the many individual victims, but also of the relationships that were part of their lives before those tragic events.”
  • Jer Thorp on Algorithmic Design and the 9/11 Memorial | Spark
    On the newly opened 9/11 memorial at Ground Zero in New York City, the names are laid according to where people were and who they were with when they died. Jer Thorp had the difficult task of designing an algorithm for placement of the names, and he talks to Nora about the challenges of using math and computer science to tackle a very, very sensitive problem. (Runs: 13:44)
  • Spark 154 – September 11 & 14, 2011 | Spark
    On this episode of Spark: The Future of Education, The Myth of the Digital Native, and Designing Memorials for 9/11. | The Myth of the Digital Native: It’s easy to assume that anyone under the age of 25 is “tech savvy”, but it turns out that’s not entirely true. A new study of undergrads suggests that these so-called “digital natives” are not so digitally minded after all. Nora speaks with Andrew Asher, the lead anthropologist on the project, as well as Eszter Hargittai who has researched differentials in how much young people know about tech. (Runs: 12:28)
  • Roger Ebert Talks Friendship, Food (And Missing It), And Living ‘Life Itself’ : NPR 091311
    Melissa Block interview with Roger Ebert, whose new memoir is “Life Itself”: “Ebert still churns out half a dozen reviews every week, and typing has become his means of speech. “This is ‘Alex,'” he explains, “a voice that came built into my computer.” Alex is part of a text-to-speech program; Ebert types, Alex speaks the words. The words flow at a remarkable rate, given that he laboriously hunts and pecks with just two fingers across the keyboard. | I came to talk with Roger Ebert about his life as a film critic and his life with illness. Because typing is a long and exhausting process for him, we agreed that I’d send some questions in advance.”
  • ‘Wonderstruck’: A Novel Approach To Picture Books : NPR 091311
    “Wonderstruck” is the story of Rose and Ben, a young boy and girl who live years and worlds apart. By the end of the book, the reader learns they have a special connection. But from early on, they have one thing in common: She is deaf and he loses his hearing when he is struck by lightening. Selznick says the idea for the book began forming when he saw a documentary about deafness and deaf culture. One of the deaf educators emphasized how hyper-attuned deaf people are to the visual world. So Selznick set out to tell the story of a deaf character in pictures. “We experience [Rose’s] story in a way that perhaps might echo the way she experiences her own life,” he explains.
  • Christine Lagarde: Changing of the Guard – Magazine – Vogue
    When she does arrive at her office, the force of her presence is palpable. When we call somebody a star, we’re sometimes hinting that along with the glamour, there may be an element of fragility or caprice; Marilyn Monroe was a star. It would be better to say of Christine Lagarde that she is a planet with a powerful field of gravity, orbiting through the skies of global high finance, the first woman to be in charge of the world’s economy. Not everyone is in her constellation, though: She’s been charged with actions in her capacity as Sarkozy’s minister of finance that resulted in a lucrative legal settlement for a powerful French businessman, Bernard Tapie; and, perhaps more shocking, she’s been accused by political skeptics of being elegant, usually a compliment in France, now subtly turned to a term of belittlement by several male members of the political elite.
  • Roger Ebert Talks Friendship, Food (And Missing It), And Living ‘Life Itself’ : NPR 091311
    Melissa Block interview with Roger Ebert, whose new memoir is “Life Itself”: “Ebert still churns out half a dozen reviews every week, and typing has become his means of speech. “This is ‘Alex,'” he explains, “a voice that came built into my computer.” Alex is part of a text-to-speech program; Ebert types, Alex speaks the words. The words flow at a remarkable rate, given that he laboriously hunts and pecks with just two fingers across the keyboard. | I came to talk with Roger Ebert about his life as a film critic and his life with illness. Because typing is a long and exhausting process for him, we agreed that I’d send some questions in advance.”
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